5 Foods to Stay Energized While you Study English in Canada

Students cook up a feast during a CultureWorks cooking class at a local resaurant
Students cook up a feast during a CultureWorks cooking class at a local resaurant

From poutine to beaver tails to ketchup chips, many Canadian foods might not seem all that healthy. But staying healthy while studying in Canada isn’t as hard as students might think. In fact, Canada is a top producer of plenty of energizing and healthy foods!

Here are some of our top picks, and why you might want to try them while you study English in Canada.

B. C. Wild Salmon: A Top Brain Food for ESL Students

Salmon is a well-known brain-fortifying food packed full of vitamins, minerals, and protein. It’s also rich in omega-3 fatty acids – an essential fatty acid known for boosting brain function and lowering blood pressure.

In Canada’s western province of British Columbia, wild salmon are still abundant and a significant part of its economy. They are a key indicator of the local ecosystem’s wellbeing and are valued by Canada’s coastal people as an important cultural resource.

Blueberries: A Healthy Fruit for Students at ESL School in Canada

When it comes to antioxidant packed fruit, wild blueberries often take the cake. These little berries are full of beneficial phenols, anthocyanins, and flavonoids. They’re also a top Canadian fruit crop. In fact, Canada is the second-biggest producer and exporter of blueberries in the world!

During the summer months, many Canadians visit local farms where they can pick their own blueberries directly from the bush. But, even during the cold winter months students at ESL school in Canada can enjoy frozen blueberries in a smoothie or cooked into a warm pie.

Saskatoon Berries: The Next Superfruit

Saskatoon berries are a lesser known fruit native to Canada’s prairie provinces. It looks like a blueberry, and tastes like a combination of grapes, cherries, and almonds. At the same time, this little berry is becoming more and more popular across Canada and around the world.

Some people even think it might be the next big “superfruit” – making it a top food for students to try at English as a second language school in Canada.

Pemmican: An Energy-Rich Food for Busy Students

Pemmican is one of Canada’s oldest traditional foods, and also one of its most energy-dense. Pemmican was first made by the Cree and Chipewyan First Nations people. It was made by grinding dried bison, caribou, elk, or moose meat into a powder, mixing it with melted fat, and sometimes adding dried berries for added flavour.

This energy-dense protein bar would last well during the harsh winter months, and was a favourite among the country’s first fur-traders. Even today, this protein packed food is still sold in some specialty stores in Canada.

Maple Syrup: A Potential New Superfood to try While You Study English in Canada

Even though this sweet syrup isn’t often seen as a health food, new studies have found that maple syrup might actually be good for you. Researchers discovered over 50 compounds in the sweet stuff. And, much to the surprise of many, several of those compounds have beneficial properties – from antioxidants to anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Some researchers even think that maple syrup could help reduce the effects of Type 2 diabetes – making this popular Canadian sweetener a potential new superfood!

CultureWorks students enjoy a maple taffy treat while they skate along the Rideau Canal
CultureWorks students enjoy a maple taffy treat while they skate along the Rideau Canal

Do you want to study English in Canada?

Discover how CultureWorks helps prepare students for university in Canada!

Students at ESL School in Canada Experience Warmest Winter in Years!

It’s finally cold enough for CultureWorks students to enjoy a snowy winter, but 2015 still marks the warmest Canadian winter on record
It’s finally cold enough for CultureWorks students to enjoy a snowy winter, but 2015 still marks the warmest Canadian winter on record

As global warming starts to heat up our planet, even Canadian winters seem to be gradually melting away. Already, a report by Statistics Canada has discovered that annual snow cover has shrunk by 5.1% since 1972.

That melting speeds up even faster during an El Nino year, when warmer temperatures blow in from the Pacific. During the 2010 El Nino, snowfall in Canada was at the second lowest level it had ever been. And, during the monster 1998 El Nino, snowfall across the country reached an all-time low.

This year, as another huge El Nino sweeps in, students might experience Canada’s warmest winter yet. Here’s a snapshot of winter 2015 so far, and what it means for students in Canada.

Ottawa: Some Summer Businesses Stay Open Longer for ESL Students

In some parts of Canada, unusually warm weather has been a blessing for certain industries and enthusiasts. In Ottawa, for example, some summer businesses have stayed open longer. Golf courses in the capital city, for example, were even open on Christmas Eve as temperatures climbed up to 17 C – double the previous record high.

For students at ESL school, it was a chance to enjoy a bit more warm weather before winter took hold. Not bad for one of the coldest capital cities on the planet!

Southern Ontario: Students at ESL School Enjoy Record-Breaking Warm Temperatures

It wasn’t just students in Ottawa who saw record-breaking temperatures. Students who study English in Canada at CultureWork’s London and Oshawa campuses have seen a few historic records set too.

In London, temperatures on December 23rd climbed up to their highest level since 1893. And, in Oshawa, Durham, and many other Canadian cities, winter 2015 brought a green Christmas to many.

North West Territories: Ice Roads Could Open Late

Up in Canada’s northern cities, freezing temperatures are expected and often necessary for essential transportation. That’s because when lakes freeze over, trucks can drive over them to remote villages, mines, and cities to bring much-needed supplies. These roads used exclusively for a few months in winter are an important part of these local economies.

Lakes need to be frozen solid before they’re strong enough to support the weight of a truck
Lakes need to be frozen solid before they’re strong enough to support the weight of a truck

Canada’s biggest winter road, the Tibbitt-to-Contwoyto Winter Road, usually opens during the last week of January when temperatures are cold enough. But, with temperatures so high, this year’s road might need to be opened later – making it harder for supplies to be driven up to communities.

Enjoying Canada’s Winter Wonderland

Without the extreme cold weather, it’s easier to get out and enjoy the many cultural activities unique to Canada’s winters. Students may choose to go ice skating or snowshoeing, play the national sports of hockey or curling, or experience the thrills of downhill or cross-country skiing – warmed up afterwards by a delicious cup of hot chocolate, of course! Winter is also an opportunity to participate in some of Canada’s many seasonal snowy festivals such as Ottawa’s Winterlude, featuring ice sculptures by international artists, a diverse array of concerts and skating on the Rideau Canal – the world’s largest ice rink.

Do you want to experience a world-famous Canadian winter?

Discover how enrolling in CultureWorks’ ESL program in Canada can help you learn English while experiencing a memorable climate and culture!

Gain Entrance to University in Canada with an On-Campus ESL Program!

CultureWorks students on campus at Western University in Ontario, Canada
CultureWorks students on campus at Western University in Ontario, Canada

Want to go to university in Canada? You’re not alone! When it comes to getting an internationally recognized degree, Canadian universities are a top choice for international students.

But many students need to improve their English before applying to degree programs in Canada. The best ESL schools partner with top universities to help international students learn exactly what they need to gain entrance to – and succeed in – their program of choice.

How exactly do top ESL programs help you get into leading Canadian universities? Read on to find out!

“Conditional Acceptance” Helps Students Transition Easily to University in Canada

University applications can be long and complex – especially when you’re completing the process in your second language.

CultureWorks takes care of applications for students who apply to its ESL university prep program. Our advisors work closely with students, and submit the application on your behalf to one of our partner Canadian universities.

Every student at CultureWorks gets conditional acceptance from a university before they start their ESL education. The only condition is that you must successfully complete the CultureWorks program. Afterward, you get direct entrance into one of CultureWorks’ prestigious partner schools. There is no need to apply again!

Learning On Campus Helps Students Feel Comfortable at Canadian University

Learning English on the campus of your future university has several advantages. On-campus ESL programs help international students explore the buildings, grounds, and resources their future school has to offer – before they even start their degree program.

For example, when you take CultureWorks English courses for King’s University, you learn directly on the King’s campus, with opportunities to meet current students and become familiar with your surroundings.

After students complete the CultureWorks program, there is no need to move to another location. You’re already a part of your new school’s community.

Special Electives Help Students Build Vocabulary for their Chosen Degree

A typical ESL program does not usually include complex engineering or business language training. But international students preparing to enter these degree programs will need special preparation to succeed at university.

CultureWorks students practice conversation online as part of a special elective course
CultureWorks students practice conversation online as part of a special elective course

CultureWorks offers international students specialized English courses in business and management, engineering and technology, as well as classes on Canadian culture, advanced conversation, and more.

ESL program graduates have the specific language skills they need to enter first year university classes with confidence.

On-Campus ESL Programs Introduce Students to Life in Canada!

On-campus ESL programs don’t just focus on classroom learning. They help international students explore their new city, visit famous landmarks, and discover Canadian culture through fun trips and activities.

CultureWorks students try ice skating near the university campus in Oshawa, Ontario
CultureWorks students try ice skating near the university campus in Oshawa, Ontario

You won’t just learn English, you’ll learn about a new country, meet new friends, and make memories to last a lifetime.

Do you want to take ESL for King’s University, Western University, Carleton University, or the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)?

Visit CultureWorks to learn how you can gain conditional acceptance to one of these prestigious institutions!

4 New Year’s Resolutions to Help You Ace Your Intensive English Program

CultureWorks students participate in a cooking class in London, Ontario
CultureWorks students participate in a cooking class in London, Ontario

A New Year’s “resolution” is a promise you make that usually involves improving yourself, breaking bad habits, and making an excellent start to the year ahead.

Whether you want to advance your English reading, strengthen your conversation skills, or discover more about Canadian culture, resolutions are a great way to help focus your learning goals for 2016.

Here are four New Year’s resolutions every ESL student can make to get the most out of studying English in Canada!

1. Read more in English While You Study ESL in Canada

Reading simple texts in English (a magazine, blog posts like this one, online newspaper articles, etc.) is key to developing fluency. In addition to readings you do in class, make a promise to yourself to read an extra half an hour at home each day.

You’ll improve your understanding of English syntax, grammar, vocabulary, and colloquialisms. This will help you perform better in class, and feel more confident when you begin university.

2. Ask More Questions in Your Intensive English Program

Feeling shy about asking questions in class? Break the silence in 2016, and start speaking up.

Asking questions is the only way to ensure you understand important English lessons, are fully prepared for tests, and can effectively learn from mistakes. This is one of the most important resolutions you can make this year.

Start small. Promise yourself to ask just one question every day at ESL school. You’ll quickly see improvements in your communication skills and your confidence!

Friendly CultureWorks instructors are happy to answer questions and provide extra help
Friendly CultureWorks instructors are happy to answer questions and provide extra help

3. Talk More with Locals While You Study English in Canada

It’s easy to put off joining a club, going to a school event, or starting a conversation in English. But talking with native English speakers is a very important part of improving your fluency, and preparing to attend university in Canada.

CultureWorks students practise their English and learn Canada’s favourite sport
CultureWorks students practise their English and learn Canada’s favourite sport

Is there a club you would like to join while you study English in Canada, or a local event you’re interested in attending?

If you’re feeling shy about mixing with native English speakers, ask a friend from your ESL class to come along with you. And remember, Canadians are incredibly nice and friendly. Every day, try saying a few words to the cashier at the grocery store, or the waiter at your local coffee shop. This is the very best way to accelerate your conversation and comprehension skills.

4. Take Part in a Local Event or Custom in Canada

Going to English as a second language school in Canada is an experience unlike any other. You’ll experience Canadian seasons, visit famous Canadian tourist sites, and take part in local customs.

When you get involved in the city where you live, you fully immerse yourself in Canadian culture and the English language. It’s a great way to meet native speakers, make new friends, and feel more at home in your new Canadian city.

CultureWorks students visit Niagara Falls
CultureWorks students visit Niagara Falls

Need a few ideas to help you get started? Try checking out our blog posts on Top Places to Visit While You Study English in Canada and 5 Ways to Love Winter While at ESL School in Canada for a few ideas!

Interested in enrolling in an intensive English program to prepare for university in Canada?

Visit CultureWorks to explore our ESL programs, university partners, and admissions process.